Implementing final cut pro with iPhone

final cut plugins

Apple’s recent release of Final Cut Pro X (FCPX) has generated quite a lot of controversy. Many features are missing, although speed improvements and new features are added. Further, this release isn’t backward compatible. Why is it different and what’s the game plan of Apple? Here is the scoop.

final cut plugins

Older versions of final cut plugins Pro were constructed with the Carbon application programming interface (API), which restricted programs to 32-bit, thereby restricting available memory to 4GB. In a time where MacBook Pros have 4GB of dual-core and memory chips, that’s a limitation. Since FCPX is a complete rewrite it is ready to operate on hardware that is present and takes advantage of multi-core processors.

Judging by the collection of features FCPX was written to add more features in the future. It currently doesn’t support OMF output, which is generally utilized to import audio into Protocols for blending, or Edit Decision List (EDL) data, a characteristic used to move a project into a different program for the finishing stage. A structure used by professionals, support and output to tape, is missing. There seem to be no plans to launch a new version of Final Cut Server, which can be used to permit users to operate on a project . Video formats, including Red and XDCAM, do not have support; due to the compilation that is complete, support for every format needs to be rewritten. Professional video editors are, understandably, worried they’ll be left in the lurch, although updates adding attributes should start showing up soon.